FREE Writing Resources ~ UK Copyright

September 2019

Copyright is, even more, a topic now than it was in 2014 when I wrote this post. I have to admit that I still am not sure most of the time but just make sure I give credit where credit is due. I schedule this post in April 2019 just after the EU got their new rules through about copyright and sharing on the internet. So by the time this post is up again it might be a big topic again.

December 2014

Last week I was introducing you to the BBC Skillwise page which offers down to earth English lessons and games to improve your English skills.

In the process of posting, I was wondering if I can use their logo without asking for permission. Therefore, I googled both “fair use” the US-American term and “fair dealing” the UK and other English speaking countries term. Even though I found enough information, I still felt pretty unsure about the whole concept. So I took my usual path: search for a picture of the BBC logo on Flickr with the creative commons and “allowed for commercial use” filter.

It bugged me though that I am so unsure of the copyright in general and how to go about using other people’s work, which for me mainly includes using pictures. And I thought some of my readers might feel the same and would be happy to have a little library to find out more.

In my search for the “fair dealing” term, I stumbled over UKCS. UKCS is a UK copyright service which offers a huge information centre about intellectual property, copyright, trademarks, design rights and patents half of which I have never heard of.

I still feel pretty overwhelmed by the sheer amount of information given. But I decided this is a link for my “Writers little helpers” bookmark in Chrome where I have saved everything practical for my writing from spell check to name pages.

Even though the page is mainly designed for the usage in British copyright law, it also gives a good overview over US-American laws and international agreements which is very useful.

I feel this is a page every author and writer should know about and have bookmarked to ensure a better understanding of copyright and its use.

What about you? Do you know your countries copyright laws and how to deal internationally with copyright or do you feel as unsure as I?

Maybe you know a great page with down to earth explanation of copyrights? Please let me know! Thanks.

FREE Writing Resources ~ Mslexia

September 2019

That is a really great magazine and I am gifting myself with another subscription when I got a new job! Their homepage has changed a little, that is why the links don’t work anymore but this post gives you an insight on how it was. It’s definitely a great resource for women writers.

November 2014

I spend a lot of time in the World Wide Web. I love to scour Twitter, Facebook and Google for resources for writers and there is not a lot that makes me really excited. Today’s FREE resource though is different:

Mslexia

Mslexia is a magazine for women writers which offers information about writing in general, publishing, on- and off-line resources as well as agents. Their homepage is a well of information if you want to publish in the UK.

The Magazine amazed me

They have amazed me so much, that I allowed myself an early Christmas present (or late birthday present πŸ™‚ ): I signed up for a one-year digital subscription on the magazine. If you have an iPhone or Android phone you can even read the magazine on your phone. The subscription gives you the opportunity to browse older editions as well.

Great resources for writers

But I digress: Why is it such a great resource for writers (and yes men will find useful information too!)?

Mslexia’s resources page is one of the most comprehensive I have ever seen. First on the list is the writer’s tip: Right now, it offers insight on how to write non-fiction and is aimed at poets and/or prose writers.

Spotlight on

Next, they put the spotlight on literary magazines, publishers and more interesting discoveries on the web: Both the literary magazine page and the publisher pages gives you a broad list of UK-based you-need-know-if-you-write publishing opportunities. A short explanation tells you what the organisation exactly does which ends with the link to their page.

On the web

“On the web” gives you anything from an app to block your internet connection to get you writing instead of browsing; over dating for book lovers to communities for writers. This is a well of miscellaneous pages that can make your writing life more intense and fun.

There is more

But there is more: Look at the left-hand side to the “Key resources” area which offers you links to agents, reference books and societies/organsiations. All three links are the same layout as the publishers and magazines pages: a short description to each book, organisation and agent and after that the link to their homepages.

A must

Mslexia resources page is a must for writers who want to publish and work in the UK. But not only for those who are already in the business. They offer you great advice and help if you are just starting to get into the publishing world of the UK.

What do you think?

Are you a subscriber to Mslexia? Did you have a look at their resources page? Then please let me know what you think about the magazine and the resources page. Thanks!

Resources:

Wikipedia
mslexia

FREE Writing Resources ~ Freelance Folder

March 2019

This is an awesome resource for writers and bloggers even though they have stopped creating new content in 2015. Check it out anyway. It’s worth it!

November 2014

Here we are, bloggers and authors, all interested in improving our craft as well as making our writing life easier.

Freelance Folder a good source

How great is it, that there is lots of information out there on the World Wide Web to help you grow your writing. One great source of information not only for freelance writers is: “Freelance Folder”.

What is Freelance Folder?

Freelance Folder is a homepage and blog dedicated to showing writers how to write better, blog better and save some time and money. This is what they say about themselves: “FreelanceFolder is a community for freelancers, entrepreneurs, work-at-home business owners, and web-workers. We strive to bring you the articles, information, and community you need to succeed. If there’s anything specific you’re looking for, please contact us to let us know!” (source: freelancefolder.com on the bottom of page)

Freelance Folder gives what is promised

They promise articles, information and community for (freelance) writers but I think they are great for authors too: Many writers today chose to have a blog to advertise for their books, showcase their new projects and just stay in contact with their readers. However, to do that successfully, you need to gain some blogging (i.e. freelance writing) know-how. And that is where Freelance Folder gives you valuable information.

Valuable information on Freelance Folder

There are posts about free writing courses, apps for project management, how to improve your homepage/blog, accounting tools and many more. Even if you have a day job you need to start thinking about your book as a business unless you do not want to sell it… but well, who wants that?

Even more information in the comment area

Do not miss to read the comment area of each post as it often gives you even more information and tips like in “7 Can’t-Miss Ways To Kick-Start The Writing Habit” which gives you clues how to get over writer’s block and into the habit of writing no matter what. The 330 something comments add their inspirations and writing tips as well as ping-backs to other blogs with valuable information.

Authors are freelance writers

In my opinion authors are freelance writers who work for their readers. They might not produce copywritten articles to potential clients but their readers or publishers are their clients and what counts for a freelance journalists helps authors too to get the “business” of writing going and the “clients” happy.

So do not miss to go and check out Freelance Folder.

Your best free resource on the net?

I love to find new and inspiring resources for writing. Therefore give me clue: what is your favourite free writing resource?

Resource: Freelance Folder

 

FREE Writing Resources ~ Shadow #Poetry

October 2018

As I mentioned a couple of times, I am integrating my old blog posts into this blog. That means I have a look through all posts and have found an old series about writing resources for free. Most of them are still working and still free so I am sharing them again:

July 2014

When I think about the Internet and pages or blogs on them I always have the feeling that they must be recent. It has changed so much and the last two or three years and has taken over our lives so much it never could have been imagined when I was young.

But it is fast-paced. The more incredible it is to find a page which is in existence for 14 years! To survive the changes on the net for such a long time and still be up to date must be a great page. That is what I say about Shadow Poetry.

This is one of the best pages full of resources for poetesses and poets I have ever set eyes on. If you are looking for an exhausting dictionary of poetic forms and resources for poets please head over and visit Shadow Poetry.

I am impressed how much work must have gone into creating this page. You find short explanations for different forms of poetry besides lots of suggestions of books for writing better poetry, competitions and publishing. A special section introduces you to Japanese Poetry but there is also a book for poetry writing from the author of the page Don Carlson.

For visually impaired readers: Photo says: The crow on harvested field withstands cold breeze. Coffee Mug warms these old hands.

I like the design of the page which shows a tree, a quill and what I believe is a firefly. The colours are kept on the darker side which is pretty fitting for Shadow poetry. The page is easy to navigate as it shows the taps to different parts of the page at the top.

Some of the explanations seem to be a little scientific for me, but the reason for that might be that English is not my mother tongue. So many expressions native English speakers might have heard already or have learned about in school are not really familiar for me.

There are gadgets as well, for example, the Magnet Poetry (You need to have Flash Player enabled) where you can create your own poem by putting together word tiles. That looks fun. Poetry quotes and a bookstore make the experience perfect.

I think this page is written by a great poetry teacher and is worth as resources for one’s own writing.

So please visit Shadow Poetry and find out for yourself!

Fellow Bloggers wrote about Poetry:

Poetry at “But I Smile Anyway

Poetry at “The Fairy Whisperer