#ThrowbackThursday: On Enemies

​I posted this first in February 2017. It’s worth pondering:

Wise words from the Dalai Lama:

“If you can cultivate the right attitude, your enemies are your best spiritual teachers because their presence provides you with the opportunity to enhance and develop tolerance, patience and understanding.”

Description for visually impaired readers: close up of hand of stone buddha. A little snail house sits in the left hand

Forgiveness and a Giggle

Hello out there, how are you? Are you still going strong, sing a song and wash your hands???? 😉

We are in extraordinary times. I do not know any time in my life when societies have been so divided like today. On top of that a pandemic. I always wonder when we entered this B-Movie horror film that’s called “reality”. So I felt this quote should remind us that love is the answer:

“Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong ~ Mahatma Gandhi”

video credit: The Top Ten Amazing via YouTube

There is a lot to forgive on any side of the coin of today’s problems but in the end all that counts is that we did the right thing and didn’t add to the confusion. But now to something entirely different…

Let’s have a giggle 😉

The guide said to us:

“Most of all do not panic”

and the answer

is 42 anyway 😉

video credit: BBC Studios via YouTube

Happy Thursday to you all despite everything 🙂

Just one more thing before you go: The hospital that is treating me is fundraising for a dedicated breast cancer unit which would allow same-day diagnosis and better premises for patients and staff.

Please, if you can spare a little money hop over to their Just Giving Page and give as little or much as you can. Or share the page on your social media. Your support means a lot to me! Thank you very much.

Affiliate link:

WordPress.com

Blast from the Past: Quote of the Day ~ Fail ~ Samuel Beckett

“Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better. Samuel Beckett”

Please head over to “Bee Wordless” and find my “Wordless Wednesday” posts. You can also find my posts about life, the universe and everything over at “The Bee Creates…“. Also, find poetry and links back to posts on “The Bee Writes…” over at Tumblr.

English translation of the Confusius quote
Portrait of Andy, Bee and Sherky Halton at the beach

#quoteoftheday ~ Strange Jewels ~ Elizabeth Gilbert

“The universe buries strange jewels deep within us all and then sands back to see if we can find them” Elizabeth Gilbert

Wikipedia on Elizabeth Gilbert

Elizabeth M. Gilbert (born July 18, 1969) is an American author, essayist, short story writer, biographer, novelist, and memoirist. She is best known for her 2006 memoir, Eat, Pray, Love, which as of December 2010 had spent 199 weeks on the New York Times Best Seller list, and which was also made into a film by the same name in 2010.[1]

 

 

 

#quoteoftheday ~ Making Mistakes ~ Tallulah Bankhead

“If I had to live my life again, I’d make the same mistakes, only sooner.” Tallulah Bankhead

IMBd on Tallulah Bankhead

Tallulah Brockman Bankhead was born on January 31, 1902 in Huntsville, Alabama. Her father was a mover and shaker in the Democratic Party who served as Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from June 4, 1936, to September 16, 1940. Tallulah had been interested in acting and, at age 15, started her stage career in the local theater troupes of Huntsville and the surrounding areas. At age 16, she won a beauty contest and, bolstered by this achievement, moved to New York City to live with her aunt and to try her hand at Broadway. She was offered a role in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920), but did not take it after she refused John Barrymore‘s invitation for a visit to the casting couch. Unfortunately, for the young Miss Bankhead, she did not make any headway on the stages of New York, so she pulled up stakes and moved to London, in 1923, to try her luck there.

For the next several years, she was the most popular actress of London’s famed West End, the British equivalent of Broadway. After starring in several well-received plays, she gained the attention of Paramount Pictures executives and returned to the United States to try her hand at the film world. Her first two films, Woman’s Law (1927) and His House in Order (1928), did not exactly set the world on fire, so she returned to do more stage work. She tried film work again with Tarnished Lady (1931), where she played Nancy Courtney, a woman who marries for money but ultimately gets bored with her husband and leaves him, only to come back to him when he is broke. The critics gave it a mixed reception. Tallulah’s personality did not shine on film as Paramount executives had hoped. She tried again with My Sin (1931) as a woman with a secret past about to marry into money. Later that year, she made The Cheat (1931), playing Elsa Carlyle, a woman who sold herself to a wealthy Oriental merchant who brands her like she was his own property and is subsequently murdered. The next year, she shot Thunder Below (1932), Faithless(1932), Make Me a Star (1932) (she had a cameo role along with several other Paramount stars) and Devil and the Deep (1932). The latter film was a star-studded affair that made money at the box-office due to the cast (Gary CooperCharles Laughton and newcomer Cary Grant). The films she was making just did not do her talent any justice, so it was back to Broadway–she did not make another film for 11 years. She toured nationally, performing in all but three states.

She was also a big hit at social affairs, where she often shocked the staid members of that society with her “untraditional” behavior. She chain-smoked and enjoyed more than her share of Kentucky bourbon, and made it a “habit” to take her clothes off and chat in the nude. A friend and fellow actress remarked on one occasion, “Tallulah dear, why are you always taking your clothes off? You have such lovely frocks.” She was also famous–or infamous–for throwing wild parties that would last for days. She returned to films in 1943 with a cameo in Stage Door Canteen (1943), but it was Lifeboat (1944) for director Alfred Hitchcock that put her back into the limelight. However, the limelight did not shine for long. After shooting A Royal Scandal (1945) she did not appear on film again until she landed a role in Fanatic (1965). Her film and small-screen work consisted of a few TV spots and the voice of the Sea Witch in the animated film The Daydreamer (1966), so she went back to the stage, which had always been first and foremost in her heart. To Tallulah, there was nothing like a live audience to perform for, because they, always, showed a lot of gratitude. On December 12, 1968, Tallulah Bankhead died at age 66 of pneumonia in her beloved New York City. While she made most of her fame on the stages of the world, the film industry and its history became richer because of her talent and her very colorful personality. Today her phrase, “Hello, Dahling” is known throughout the entertainment world.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Denny Jackson

#QuoteoftheDay ~ Sailing Ships in Storms ~ Luisa May Alcott

Description for visually impaired readers: image of a beach in background with white waves and sea to the right. White writing says: I am not afraid of storms for I am learning how to sail my ship” Louisa May Alcott

louisamayalcott.org on Luisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania on November 29, 1832. She and her sisters Anna, Elizabeth, and [Abba] May were educated by their father, teacher/philosopher A. Bronson Alcott, and raised on the practical Christianity of their mother, Abigail May.

Louisa spent her childhood in Boston and in Concord, Massachusetts, where her days were enlightened by visits to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s library, excursions into nature with Henry David Thoreau, and theatricals in the barn at “Hillside” (now Hawthorne’s “Wayside”).

Like the character of “Jo March” in Little Women, young Louisa was a tomboy: “No boy could be my friend till I had beaten him in a race,” she claimed, “and no girl if she refused to climb trees, leap fences …”

For Louisa, writing was an early passion. She had a rich imagination and her stories often became the basis of melodramas that she and her sisters would act out for friends. Louisa preferred to play the “lurid” parts in these plays –“the villains, ghosts, bandits, and disdainful queens.”

At age 15, troubled by the poverty plaguing her family, she vowed that she “will do something by and by. Don’t care what, teach, sew, act, write, anything to help the family; and I’ll be rich and famous and happy before I die, see if I won’t!”

Confronting a society that offered little opportunity to women seeking employment, Louisa nonetheless persisted: “… I will make a battering-ram of my head and make my way through this rough and tumble world.” Whether as a teacher, seamstress, governess, or household servant, for many years Louisa did any work she could find.

Louisa’s career as an author began with poetry and short stories that appeared in popular magazines. In 1854, when she was 22, her first book, Flower Fables, was published. A milestone along her literary path was Hospital Sketches (1863), a truthful and poignant account of her service as a Civial War nurse in Washington, DC based on letters she wrote home to her family in Concord.

When Louisa was 35 years old, her publisher, Thomas Niles, asked her to write “a book for girls.” The 492 pages of Little Women, Part I were dashed off by Louisa at the desk her father built for her in Orchard House in less than three months 1868. The novel is largely based on the coming of age stories of Louisa and her sisters, with many of the domestic experiences inspired by events that actually took place at Orchard House.

Virtually overnight, Little Women was a phenomenal success, primarily for its timeless storytelling with the first American juvenile heroine, “Jo March,” who acted from her own individuality — a free-thinking, flawed person rather than the idealized stereotype of perfection then prevalent in children’s fiction.

In all, Louisa published over 30 books and collections of short stories and poems. She died on March 6, 1888, only two days after her father, and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, MA.