#ClimateJusticeSaturday ~ Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation on how climate change affects the work force

Hello out there, how are you doing? I hope life is treating you well and if not that there is always someone to support you.

In the last couple of Saturdays, I introduced you climate activists from all over the world which I learned about from Mary Robinson’s book β€œClimate Justice – A Man-Made Problem with a Feminist Solution” (the book is known under several slightly different titles). We are nearly at the end of this series with only two more to come after today.

You might have heard the reasoning a lot that we can’t change our societies to be carbon neutral because it will destroy jobs. I always thought that to be a short-sighted reasoning because there won’t be any jobs on a dead planet. After all we can’t eat money and we won’t be consuming anything if our houses are flooded or burned by wildfires.

Someone who is pondering the effects of climate change on the work-force for many years is Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation and she explains her thoughts in this video by Climate TV. Please visit the link underneath the video if it doesn’t play here on the blog.

video credit: Climate TV via Climate Group on YouTube

Happy Saturday to you all despite everything!!!!!

4 thoughts on “#ClimateJusticeSaturday ~ Sharan Burrow, General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation on how climate change affects the work force

  1. Very thoughtful and thought-provoking interview, Bee … thank you for sharing it! I hope to go back and view some of your other Saturday posts, as time permits. This lady has some very good, serious and manageable ideas. Thanks again! πŸ™‹

    Liked by 1 person

    • If you are interested, I suggest you’ll get Mary Robinson’s book too. Thats is how I got to know them. It has different names but the version I read was “Climate change: a man-made problem with a feminist Solution”. I thought the title is a bit misleading because its not only about women and showcased more people and the history of some of the activists rather than the solutions. It was still great to read. πŸ˜šπŸ™‹β€β™€οΈπŸ

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.